Golden Pineapple Tarts a.k.a ‘Golf Ball’ Tarts

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These pineapple tarts have an ultra buttery, melt-in-the-mouth pastry crumb that gives way to a sweet and tangy, delicious pineapple jam filling. The pastry comes together easily – no creaming needed!
Golf ball pineapple tarts are closed pineapple tarts made with a tender, shortcrust pastry dough and a pineapple jam filling.

I couldn’t wait to bake these extra buttery, melt-in-the-mouth pineapple tarts this year and share the results with you.

This is a long awaited recipe update, and one that I hope will please all the pineapple tart fans out there! Yes, I mean Y.O.U. ?

Why these pineapple tarts are so delicious

  • Ultra buttery! So, if you don’t know it yet, I love buttery, buttery pastry. And this pastry gives you that rich, sweet buttery flavour in every tart!
  • Tender, melt-in-the-mouth crumb. Biting into these pineapple tarts are going to be like love at first bite. And let me warn you, they’re highly addictive! One of my top goals in this recipe update was to make a shortcrust pastry that’s tender and more melty!
  • Super easy pastry dough. This shortcrust pastry comes together quickly in a bowl – there’s no creaming of butter and sugar required.
Golf ball pineapple tarts are closed pineapple tarts made with a tender, shortcrust pastry dough and a pineapple jam filling.

Can I make pineapple tarts in advance?

We all know how immensely satisfying and delicious homemade pineapple tarts are. It goes without saying that it takes quite a bit of work, and a few hours at a stretch.

But it’s all so worth it when you see how much these are appreciated by your family and friends. Their enjoyment and compliments will make you want to do it every year!

If you’d like to make these ahead of time, here are a couple of suggestions to make your life easier and as hassle-free as possible.

  • If you plan to cook your own pineapple jam (which I highly recommend ?!), this can be done a day or two in advance. When well stored, homemade pineapple jam will keep in the chiller for up to three weeks, and in the freezer for up to a year.
  • Likewise, the pastry dough can also be made ahead and kept chilled for up to 3 days. This pastry dough also freezes very well. If frozen, let it thaw in the chiller the night before, before dividing, filling and shaping into tarts.
Golden pineapple tarts or golf ball pineapple tarts

Ingredients for pineapple tarts

  • Pineapple jam (store-bought or homemade). I always make my own pineapple jam, because there’s just so much more flavour and authenticity from cooking your own jam. Not to mention, you can make it less sweet. I’ve got you covered if you’re looking to make your own pineapple jam from scratch here, and I promise, it’s less hassle than you might think.
  • Cake flour. Cake flour has a lower protein content than all-purpose flour and makes a more tender pastry.
  • Corn flour or corn starch. Adding corn flour also makes the pastry more tender, and contributes to the melt-in-the-mouth factor.
  • Butter, chilled. Salted or unsalted is fine, but be sure to use chilled butter and preferably, a premium quality butter like Danish butter. Rubbing cold butter in with flour is what makes the pastry more flaky, less tough. I recommend using salted butter, as salt accentuates the buttery taste. If you use unsalted butter, be sure to add fine salt (as suggested in the recipe card).
  • Confectioner’s sugar (icing sugar). Confectioner’s sugar is finely ground sugar with a little added corn starch. Unlike regular sugar, the powdered texture of confectioner’s sugar gives this pastry a fine crumb.
  • Milk powder. Milk powder adds colour and flavour to the pastry. I use full-fat milk powder.
  • Egg yolk. I use yolks from large eggs.
  • Vanilla extract. A little vanilla extract adds a lovely sweetness and warm flavour to the pastry. Try to use pure vanilla extract, wherever possible, as it has a much deeper flavour than the artificial essence.
  • Salt. Add salt if you use unsalted butter. Use fine salt, as it distributes more evenly throughout the flour mixture.
  • Yellow food colouring (optional). We eat with our eyes, after all. Adding a few drops of food colour makes for a beautiful golden pastry when baked. But don’t go overboard.
Golf ball pineapple tarts

Step-by-step: How to make pineapple tarts

Prepare the pineapple jam filling

Roll the pineapple jam into balls, each weighing 10 g. Cover loosely with clingwrap and let the jam sit in the chiller while you make the pastry dough.

Rolled pineapple jam filling for pineapple tarts

Make the shortcrust pastry dough

  • Step 1: Sift together cake flour, corn flour, confectioner’s sugar, milk powder and salt (only add salt if you’re using unsalted butter).
  • Step 2: With your fingertips, rub chilled butter cubes into the flour mixture until the mixture resembles coarse breadcrumbs. While rubbing, keep lifting the flour well up in the bowl. This allows air in between and prevents the butter from softening too much.
  • Step 3: Add the yolks, vanilla extract and yellow food colour (optional). Tip: If you do add food colour, mix it in with the yolks before adding to the butter breadcrumbs.
  • Step 4: Start by using a fork or flexible scraper to mix in the yolks.
  • Step 5: Finish up by hand, mixing lightly until you get a soft and smooth dough. Be careful not to overwork the dough.
  • Step 6: Roll the dough into balls, each weighing 15 g. Then chill for 10 mins before filling.

Fill and shape golf ball pineapple tarts

  • Flatten a ball of dough between your palms. Place a ball of pineapple jam filling in the centre.
  • Enclose the jam. Gently press the pastry around to patch up places where it’s too thin or where the jam isn’t fully enclosed.
  • Gently roll the enclosed tart between your palms to smoothen and shape into a golf ball.
  • Place on a baking tray lined with baking paper, spacing the tarts an inch (2-cm) apart.

Chill pineapple tarts before baking

  • Place the tray in the chiller for 10 to 15 minutes, before baking. Note: If you don’t have room in your chiller to put in the tray, you can place the tarts close together on a large dish plate, and chill. Once chilled, the tarts will be firm to handle and it will be easy to transfer to the baking tray.
  • Meanwhile, this would be a good time to start preheating the oven to 150°C (302°F). Have an oven rack placed in the centre of the oven.

Bake the tarts!

  • Brush the tops of the tarts with egg wash. Bake in the centre of the pre-heated oven for 20 to 25 minutes.
  • Half-way through the baking time, take the tray out of the oven and brush the tarts with a second layer of egg wash.
  • Once the tops and base of the tarts have browned nicely, the tarts are done. This may take about 25 minutes, depending on your oven. Note: As the tarts bake, it is normal for cracks to appear. This is because the jam expands as it gets heated. Once the tarts cool, the cracks will shrink.
  • Let the baked tarts cool on the tray for 5 minutes. Then, transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.
Freshly baked pineapple tarts with golden brown tops

How to store pineapple tarts

Once completely cooled, store the pineapple tarts in an air-tight container and seal tightly. The tarts will keep well for up to 3 weeks in a cool, dry area.

If you wish to make these tarts well ahead of time and need to keep for longer than 2 to 3 weeks, chill the tarts in air-tight containers. When chilled, the tarts can keep well for up to 3 months.

Golf ball pineapple tarts made with a tender, shortcrust pastry and pineapple jam filling.

Hope you’ll enjoy these as much as we do! Happy baking and stay safe, everyone – ? Celia

P.s. If you tried my previous pastry dough (before this update), please let me know and I’ll be happy to send you the recipe.

Here are more sweet treats you might enjoy:

Tried this recipe? I’d love to see! Remember to share your pics on Instagram and tag @foodelicacy or #foodelicacy.

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Golden Pineapple Tarts

Golden Pineapple Tarts

Yield: 40 - 50, depending on size
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Chilling Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 10 minutes

These pineapple tarts have an ultra buttery, melt-in-the-mouth pastry crumb that gives way to a sweet and tangy, delicious pineapple jam filling. The pastry comes together easily - no creaming needed!

Ingredients

For the filling:

  • 500 g pineapple jam (store-bought or homecooked)

For the pastry dough:

  • 240 g cake flour
  • 30 g corn flour
  • 50 g confectioner's sugar
  • 36 g milk powder (preferably full-fat)
  • ½ tsp fine salt (omit if using salted butter)
  • 200 g salted butter, chilled
  • 2 egg yolks
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • Few drops of yellow food colour (optional)

For egg wash:

  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 tsp water
  • 2 tsp oil
  • 2 tsp condensed milk

Instructions

Prepare the pineapple jam filling:

  1. Roll the pineapple jam into balls, each weighing 10 g. Cover loosely with clingwrap and let these sit in the chiller while making the pastry dough.

Make the pastry dough:

  1. Sift together cake flour, corn flour, confectioner's sugar, milk powder and salt (omit if using salted butter). Set aside.
  2. Cut the chilled butter into cubes. Place in a large mixing bowl. With your fingertips, rub butter cubes into the flour mixture until the mixture resembles coarse breadcrumbs. While rubbing, keep lifting the flour well up in the bowl. This allows air in between and prevents the butter from softening too much.
  3. Add the yolks, vanilla extract and yellow food colour (optional). Cut into the butter-flour mixture with a fork or flexible scraper. Finish up by hand, mixing lightly until the mixture comes together into a soft and smooth dough.
  4. Roll the dough into balls, each weighing 15 g. If Chill for 10 mins before filling.

Fill and shape the pineapple tarts:

  1. Flatten a ball of dough between your palms.
  2. Place a ball of pineapple jam filling in the centre. Enclose the filling, and gently roll between your palms to smoothen and shape into a golf ball tart.
  3. Place on a baking tray lined with baking paper, spacing the tarts an inch (2-cm) apart.
  4. Place the tray in the chiller for 10 to 15 minutes, before baking. (Note: If you don't have room in your chiller to put in a tray, you can place the tarts close together on a large dish plate, and chill. Once chilled, the tarts will be firm to handle. Transfer to the prepared baking tray, spacing them apart.)
  5. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 150°C (302°F).

Brush with egg wash and bake:

  1. Brush the tops of the tarts with egg wash.
  2. Bake in the centre of the pre-heated oven for 20 to 25 minutes. Half-way through the baking time, take the tray out of the oven and brush the tarts with a second layer of egg wash.
  3. Bake until the tops are golden brown, and the base of the tarts start to lightly brown, about 25 - 30 minutes. Note: Chilled tarts may take 5 mins longer. As the tarts bake, it is normal for cracks to appear. Do not be alarmed. This is due to the jam expanding outwards as it gets heated. Once the tarts cool, the cracks will shrink.
  4. Let baked tarts cool on the tray for 5 minutes. Then, transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.


How to store pineapple tarts:

  1. Once completely cooled, store in an air-tight container and seal tightly. The tarts will keep well for up to 3 weeks in a cool, dry area. If stored in the chiller, it will keep well for up to 3 months.

Notes

How many tarts can the pastry dough make?

Based on a 15 g pastry dough and 12 g pineapple jam filling, this pastry dough can make about 40 large golf ball tarts. For smaller golf ball tarts, I recommend a 10 - 12 g pastry dough and 8 - 10 g jam filling, which makes about 50 tarts.

Is this pastry dough suitable for open-faced pineapple tarts?

This is a tender, melt-in-the-mouth pastry which is not quite suitable for open-faced pineapple tarts as it may be too soft to work with.

Why does the egg wash use oil and condensed milk?

Oil gives the tarts a glossier sheen when baked, while condensed milk renders a deeper brown due to its sugar content. However, you will not even taste the sweetness or flavour of the condensed milk.

If you prefer, you can use a simple egg wash made with 2 egg yolks, 1 tsp of water, and a few drops of yellow food colour (optional).

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 40 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 82Total Fat: 5gSaturated Fat: 3gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 29mgSodium: 63mgCarbohydrates: 9gFiber: 0gSugar: 3gProtein: 1g

All nutritional values are approximate only.

Did you make this recipe?

I’d love to see! Remember to share your pics on Instagram and tag @foodelicacy or #foodelicacy.

14 Comments

  1. Hi Celia, I am so lucky to have stumbled upon your amazing blog!! I love everything about it! I am going to try your recipe for the pineapple tart pastry. I realised the ingredients include baking powder and self raising flour. Just curious to know if the pastry would rise when baked although the photos do not seem to show it. I have been using another recipe which does not use any rising agent. Thanks!

  2. Thank you so much for your kind compliment! I do hope you’ll try it soon…it’s a bit of work but you’ll really get priceless satisfaction out of it! Hope you’ll share with me when you do! Happy baking! Cheers, Celia

  3. Hi Ms.Celia,
    The tarts are designed so well that they resemble real pineapples. Great work and this recipe is in my immediate cooking list.

  4. Thank you so much, Lynnette!

  5. Celia your pineapple tarts are so beautiful and am sure they taste just as good!

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