Japanese cheesecake (a.k.a cotton cheesecake, souffle cheesecake or jiggly cheesecake) is unlike any cheesecake you’ve ever tasted. Light and fluffy, this Japanese dessert has a rich and creamy taste that isn’t too sweet. It’s the perfect teatime or after-dinner treat.

The Japanese cotton cheesecake is much-loved by the Japanese and people all over the world for its incredibly light and fluffy texture.

Popularly called Japanese soufflé cheesecake or Japanese jiggly cheesecake, people go crazy for its soft and fluffy, melt-in-the-mouth texture. It has elements of a rich velvety custard and a sponge cake that’s deliciously light and luscious at the same time!

It’s rich and creamy enough to satisfy cheesecake fans, but I’ve also found that people who aren’t fond of cheese-heavy desserts enjoy it too. So if you’re thinking of bringing a party or after-dinner dessert and aren’t sure of palettes, this cheesecake is easily a crowd-pleaser.

Note: This Japanese cotton cheesecake recipe is a major update and now includes detailed tips and information, as well as step-by-step instructions with accompanying process shots to ensure more consistent and fool-proof baking outcomes.

Common problems with Japanese cotton cheesecake

Making a Japanese cotton cheesecake from scratch looks deceptively easy but this is not ideally a cheesecake that first-time bakers start with. I’ve come across every possible problem making this particular type of cheesecake.

Excessive shrinking, cracking, leaky pans, soggy bottoms, under-baking, over-baking, etc. This has easily been my most challenging bake so far🤣.

For weeks, I tested every aspect of making a Japanese cheesecake – 18 times to be exact. This recipe update is the culmination of all that effort to ensure you can make this soft and fluffy Japanese cheesecake with the greatest chance of success.

A slice of Japanese cotton cheesecake (soufflé cheesecake) lifted with a cake spoon, showing a light, airy and fluffy crumb. In the background, is another slice set on a serving plate.

10 top tips for the best Japanese cheesecake

In this section, I share all that I’ve learned from my failures so you can have the greatest chance of success, especially if this is your first time making a Japanese cheesecake.

Don’t be disheartened or discouraged if your cheesecake does not turn out quite right the first few times. If you executed the recipe precisely, the likely culprit could be something else, for eg. an oven that tends to run a little hot, so make small adjustments and try again.

Even if you are an experienced baker, please do take some time to review these tips to help prevent unexpected issues.

  1. Read the recipe carefully. This sounds basic, but I highly recommend reading the recipe a few times. Familiarise yourself with the steps and instructions, especially the key points that need care and attention.
  2. Measure ingredients accurately. Measuring by weight rather than volume greatly improves the accuracy and consistency of baking outcomes. It also makes a recipe easily scalable. I recommend using a kitchen digital scale like this one – it’s an invaluable tool for all your future bakes!
  3. Have everything ready before you start. This includes measuring ingredients, preparing cake pans, mixing bowls, tools and equipment. Doing so will help you complete the recipe instructions smoothly, effortlessly and without interruption.
  4. Control the oven temperature. The soufflé cheesecake is a little finicky, so a small temperature change can make or break (literally) the cheesecake! I highly recommend using an oven thermometer so you know exactly how hot your oven is running internally. You’ll be able to manage and control temperature differences.
  5. Bake at two temperatures. Baking at two temperatures ensures a slow and stable bake and minimises cracking issues.
  6. Start LOW, finish HIGH (baking temperature). Many YouTube and internet recipes recommend starting at a higher temperature and dialling down to finish. However, I followed Japanese Pastry Chef Masayoshi Ishikawa’s reverse approach to baking. Baking at a lower temperature for the most part and then at a hotter temperature at the end finally helped me achieve crack-free Japanese souffle cheesecakes.
  7. Beat the meringue to firm peaks. The meringue is by most accounts, the trickiest part when making a Japanese cheesecake. Do not under-whip (soft peaks) or over-whip (stiff peaks) the meringue. I cover more on this below so you know exactly how to do this with care and a bit of skill.
  8. Don’t skip the water bath. The gentle steam allows the cheesecake batter to cook slowly and evenly. This minimises cracking (when baked at the right temperature) and also results in a smoother and creamier texture.
  9. Don’t worry about cracks! Even commercially-baked cheesecakes have cracks or imperfections. It’s better to get the texture right than obsess over appearance. A cracked and crinkled cheesecake is still utterly delicious and enjoyable!
  10. Cool the cheesecake gradually. A drastic temperature change can cause the cheesecake to collapse or shrink excessively. Let the cheesecake cool in stages by sitting in a turned-off oven, then with the oven door slightly ajar, before taking it out to room temperature.
A Japanese cotton cheesecake (soufflé cheesecake) set on a serving plate, with a slice in view showing a light, airy and fluffy crumb.

Ingredients

To make this Japanese cheesecake recipe, these are the ingredients you’ll need:

  • cream cheese. Use only brick cream cheese (I use Philadelphia’s in most of my cheesecakes but have also used other brands with equally good results). Do not use cream cheese that is labelled as spreadable. These alter the taste and consistency of the cheesecake batter and won’t work out well.
  • butter. I use unsalted butter. You can use salted butter, but omit the additional salt listed in the recipe card.
  • milk (or heavy cream). I prefer a light-tasting cheesecake so I use whole milk. Avoid reduced-fat, low-fat or skimmed milk – it just won’t taste right. If you prefer a richer flavour, replace the whole milk with heavy cream.
  • cake flour. Using a low-protein flour like cake flour gives this cheesecake a soft and tender crumb. A good alternative is pastry flour. However, if you don’t have either, you can also use regular all purpose flour.
  • corn flour. Corn flour (corn starch) stabilises the eggs and helps to prevent cracking. But it also contributes to this cheesecake’s smooth and velvety texture.
  • salt. A pinch of salt enhances the flavour of the other ingredients and improves the overall taste of the cheesecake.
  • eggs. I use large eggs, each weighing 60 grams (2 – 2.25 ounces) with its shell.
  • caster sugar. Caster sugar is the usual choice for meringues as the fine-grained particles dissolve easily in the foamy batter. Use regular granulated sugar if this is not available.
  • cream of tartar. Quickens the whipping process and contributes to a meringue’s stable, glossy and voluminous state.
  • lemon juice or vanilla extract (optional). I personally enjoy a pure, creamy flavour in Japanese cheesecake but you can add a dash of lemon juice for added tang or vanilla extract, if desired.

Equipment and tools

  • Deep 6″ (15 cm) round pan. Because this cheesecake batter rises a lot, you will need a deep round pan that’s at least 3 – 4 inches (7.5 to 10 cm) deep. I’ve baked this batter in a standard 7 x 2 inch (17 x 5 cm) round pan but a 6 x 3 inch (15 x 7.5 cm) pan gives this cheesecake a nice height. One workaround is to line the sides of a 2-inch cake pan with 3-inch tall parchment paper.
  • Larger pan. Good options are a standard roasting pan, a casserole dish, or a larger cake pan. Whichever you use, make sure it’s deep enough to hold an inch (2.5 cm) of water and roomy enough for the cake pan to sit in it without the sides touching.
  • Saucepan. You will need a saucepan to set up a double boiler.
  • Heatproof bowl. This can be a glass or metal bowl that sits in the saucepan. It will hold the mixture to be heated (cream cheese, butter and milk).
  • Mixing bowls. A couple of large mixing bowls are essential as you will be working with the cream cheese mixture and egg white mixture (meringue) separately.
  • Whisk
  • Spatula
  • Strainer
  • Stand mixer or electric beaters
  • Parchment paper

How to make the best Japanese soufflé cheesecake

In this section, I show step-by-step how to make a Japanese cheesecake. I cover all the key points, what to expect and helpful tips every step of the way. Doing so, I hope you’ll have the greatest chance of success, especially if this is your first time making a Japanese cheesecake.

Prepare the cheesecake mould / cake pan

Grease thoroughly the sides and rim of a 6 x 3 inch /15 x 7.5 cm deep round pan – don’t leave any spot un-greased and go all the way up the sides to the rim. Line the bottom of the pan with parchment paper.

Tip: Do not line the sides with parchment paper as the baked cheesecake will have unsightly folds and creases around its sides which doesn’t look nice. You only need to line the bottom of the pan with parchment paper as this will make it easier to un-mould the cheesecake. I do not recommend using a loose-bottom pan or springform pan to bake this cheesecake.

Make the cream cheese batter

  1. Set up a double boiler (bain marie): Fill a saucepan or smaller pot with an inch/2.5 cm of water. Heat on a low setting until the water reaches a bare simmer. 
  2. Melt the cream cheese mixture. Place the cream cheese, butter and milk in a heatproof bowl and sit the bowl over the saucepan. Use a whisk to break up the cream cheese as it melts. Keep stirring until the mixture becomes smooth and no lumps remain. Remove the cream cheese mixture from the double boiler and stir the mixture for 1 – 2 minutes to cool.

    What to look out for:  Do not let the cream cheese get hotter than 60°C (140°F) otherwise it may end up toughening the protein in the yolks added later. To avoid this, keep the water at a bare simmer, ensure the mixing bowl sits above the water level, or check the temperature with a food thermometer.
  1. Add the dry ingredients. Sift together the plain flour, corn flour and salt into the cream cheese mixture. Stir with a whisk until just absorbed. The mixture will be quite lumpy, this is OKAY.
  2. Add the yolks. Quickly whisk in the yolks, one at a time. Keep stirring until the cream cheese mixture becomes smooth. Use a silicon spatula to scrape the cream cheese off the bottom and sides of the bowl and mix in well.
  3. Strain the batter. Strain the cream cheese batter into an empty mixing bowl, pressing against the strainer with a spatula. Catch the mixture off the bottom of the strainer as well.

    What to look out for: Adding the flour before the eggs helps to bring down the temperature of the mixture. Do not over-mix the flour, just enough until it is absorbed. The mixture will be lumpy but this is OKAY. It will smoothen out after incorporating the yolks in the next step.
  1. Make the meringue. Separately, place the egg whites and sugar in a large mixing bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a whisk. Sprinkle over with the cream of tartar. With electric beaters or a stand mixer, whip the egg whites at medium-high speed and keep whipping until firm peaks form (read my meringue tips in the ‘How to prevent Japanese cheesecakes from cracking’ section below).

    What to look out for: When separating the eggs, do not leave traces of egg yolk in the egg whites. Always whip egg whites in a dry and grease-free mixing bowl. Once you start whipping, observe the air bubbles and the general appearance of the meringue. As the air bubbles get smaller and begin to disappear, the meringue will start to get finer, thicker (foamier) and begin to look glossy. This is when you’ll want to stop the whisk occasionally to check for firm peaks.

Tip: Adding all the sugar at once helps reduce the tendency to overwhip the egg whites. However, once you get more precise working with meringues, it is okay to whip in the sugar gradually, typically in 3 lots.

  1. Combine. Fold one-third of the meringue into the cream cheese mixture with a whisk until well incorporated. Add the remaining meringue and continue folding gently to avoid deflating the meringue. Once the meringue disappears, switch to a silicon spatula. Fold a few more times, again gently, until the batter is smooth and has a uniform consistency.
  2. Fill the cake pan. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Run a metal skewer through the batter to knock out air pockets. Give the cake pan a few firm taps on the counter. 
  3. Set up the water bath. Place a tea cloth in the larger pan. Place the cake pan on top of the tea cloth. Carefully pour the hot water into the roasting pan until an inch/2.5 cm deep. Open the oven door, and place the roasting pan in the oven. Note: The temperature of the oven will drop slightly by the time you finish setting up the water bath. This is OK.
  1. Bake. Bake at 110℉ (230°F) for 60 minutes. Dial the temperature to 160℃ (320°F) and set the timer for 15 minutes. Now, the cheesecake will start to rise dramatically and brown. Turn off the oven once the surface has browned evenly.

    What to look out for: At the lower temperature, the cheesecake rises VERY SLOWLY. Do not be overly concerned if it doesn’t rise a lot. Towards the end of the first 60 minutes, the cheesecake should rise and look visibly puffed and dome-shaped in its centre. When the temperature heats up, the cheesecake will rise dramatically and brown at the same time.
  2. Cool gradually. Let the cheesecake sit in the turned-off oven for 5 minutes. Then open the oven door, keeping it slightly ajar with an oven mitten, and let the cheesecake sit for another 10 minutes.

    What to look out for: As it sits in the turned-off oven, the cheesecake will shrink a little from the sides of the pan and lose about a quarter of its height. This is totally normal for this type of cheesecake.
  1. Unmould. Remove the cake pan from the water bath, take off the foil and immediately un-mould the cheesecake from the pan. To un-mould the cheesecake, place a piece of parchment paper followed by a wire rack/plate over the top of the cake. Gently flip over the cake.

    Carefully lift up the pan to release the cake. Gently peel the parchment paper off the base of the cake. Now, cover the base with another serving plate and flip the cake again. Let cool completely (please note that the cheesecake will be delightfully jiggly fresh out of the pan but will firm up as it sits).

How do I prevent Japanese cheesecake from cracking?

I was on a mission when I started testing this recipe – I wanted consistently crack-free Japanese cheesecakes! By the way, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with bit of cracking now and then, so long as your Japanese cheesecakes don’t like a fault line!

When I finally figured out what consistently worked (and what didn’t) in my own trials and tests, it came down to the two most important factors: meringue and temperature.

Temperature

When the oven temperature is too high or too hot, the top of the cheesecake expands at a quicker rate than the centre. It also starts to brown and form a crust too soon. By the time the centre begins to cook, the trapped air expands and exerts upward pressure. This pushes against the crust, causing cracks to form.

In most cases, a hot oven temperature is caused by:

  • oven running too hot
  • baking at too high a temperature
  • baking too long
  • placing the cake pan too close to the top heating element, or
  • baking without a water bath or with insufficient water in the water bath.

To avoid running an oven too hot, bake at a lower temperature for the most part. Beginning at a low temperature allows the cheesecake to cook slowly and stably so it enjoys a controlled rise. Finishing at a higher temperature gives the cheesecake the extra rise and browning at the end.

In my oven, the temperature combination of 110°C(230°F) and 160°C (320°F) consistently yielded perfect results (smooth tops without cracks). You may have to adjust a bit to see what temperatures work in your oven but it shouldn’t be too far off (for eg. 100°C(212°F) and 150°C (302°F).

A close-up view of the light and fluffy crumb of a Japanese cotton cheesecake.

Meringue

As I mentioned earlier, the trickiest part of making a Japanese cheesecake is the meringue. The Japanese cheesecake targets a meringue with firm peaks, not soft but not stiff either.

There are 3 stages of meringue peaks: soft, firm and stiff. As you keep whipping the egg whites, the peaks will transition from soft to firm to stiff.

It’s important to occasionally pause your whipping to check the stage of stiffness if you’re unsure how far along your meringue is.

How to check a meringue for firm peaks

Pause your whipping. Dip your whisk straight into the meringue, then pull it out and flip it upside down so the whisk is fully vertical to observe the peak.

The meringue should hold a firm shape with distinct ridges, but the tips fold back on themselves.

If you’re still unsure, do this one or two more times. Give the meringue a gentle stir with your whisk, then pull it out, flip it upside down and check the meringue peaks again.

A mixing bowl with meringue whipped to firm peaks characterised by a firm shape with soft tips that curl slightly.

To nail down a firm meringue:

  • add all the sugar to the egg whites before you start.
    Tip: Adding all the sugar at the beginning reduces the tendency to overwhip the meringue by eliminating differences in individual whipping techniques.
  • whip at a medium speed throughout – slow and steady wins the race. It may take a bit longer, but you’ll be less likely to overwhip.
  • pause whipping more frequently to check. Observe the air bubbles in the meringue. As the air bubbles get smaller and begin to disappear, the meringue gets foamier and thicker. Once the whisk leaves impressions in the meringue, you’ll want to pause whipping more frequently to check for firm peaks.

Japanese cheesecake vs regular cheesecake

Most of us have indelible impressions of Western-style cheesecakes with rich and decadent flavours, textures, and myriad toppings and glazes.

So how does the Japanese cotton cheesecake compare to a regular cheesecake, for example, New York cheesecake?

  • Appearance. Japanese cotton cheesecakes have a golden brown top and cream-coloured crumb similar to a genoise sponge cake. The sides of the cheesecake are smooth, often appearing crinkled, and do not have a biscuit crust.
  • Texture. Where Western-style cheesecakes are heavy and dense, Japanese soufflé cheesecakes are lighter and spongier. They’re also famous for being jiggly fresh out of the oven (they do lose the jiggly-ness and firm up once left to sit out for a while).
  • Method. Most Western-style cheesecakes incorporate whole eggs into the cheesecake batter. On the contrary, Japanese cheesecakes are made with egg whites whipped into a meringue and incorporated in the batter, giving this cheesecake its light and airy texture.
  • Water bath. Japanese cotton cheesecakes are always baked in a water bath while Western-style cheesecakes can be baked as well as no-bake desserts and do not necessarily use a water bath.
  • Calories. At less than 160 calories a typical serving, a Japanese cheesecake is such a light treat. You can have a second helping (or more) without limiting yourself to tiny servings, obsessing over calories, or derailing that nutrition plan you’ve worked hard to stick with. On the other hand, Western-style cheesecakes tend to be loaded with fat and sugar and are notoriously high in calories.

Frequently asked questions

How do you serve a Japanese cotton cheesecake?

A Japanese cotton cheesecake can be enjoyed eaten warm or chilled. Enjoy a slice when it is softest and fluffiest (i.e. jiggly) fresh out of the cake pan, or shortly after. An overnight chill in the refrigerator improves the cheesecake’s flavour but will also firm up the texture, becoming spongier.

You can warm up a cold slice of Japanese cheesecake in the microwave for 10 – 15 seconds at medium power to get it fluffy as fresh baked.

It is customarily left plain, or at best dusted with some icing sugar. You can serve it with fresh fruit on the side like strawberries, as well as with a dollop of fresh whipped cream.

Why did my Japanese cheesecake fail to rise?

The most common reason for a Japanese cheesecake failing to rise or not rising much is an under-whipped meringue. A poorly whipped meringue lacks volume (insufficient trapped air bubbles) and stability. It won’t hold its foamy structure well when folded into the batter, resulting in a loose and runny batter.

As a result, the cheesecake barely rises or rises only a little. The cheesecake bakes up flat and dense. It will lack volume and height due to its weak structure.

Why is my Japanese cheesecake not fluffy?

An overworked cheesecake batter will cause a firm meringue to deflate and lose trapped air bubbles, causing the cake to bake up flat and dense. The extra air whipped into the meringue is what enables the cheesecake to rise when the trapped air heats up and expands in a hot oven.

On the other hand, an under-whipped meringue also lacks trapped air bubbles because it has not been whipped to a stable, foamy structure. In both cases, the batter will bake up dense instead of fluffy.

Also, baking at too low a temperature can also result in a dense cheesecake as the temperature is not hot enough.

Can Japanese cotton cheesecake be kept at room temperature?

Yes, Japanese cotton cheesecakes keep well at room temperature for up to 12 hours fresh out of the oven. Beyond that time, keep the cheesecake in a well-sealed airtight container and store it in the refrigerator. Japanese cotton cheesecakes can be enjoyed eaten warm or chilled.

Can you freeze Japanese cheesecake?

Yes, Japanese cheesecakes are easy to freeze and can be kept in the freezer for up to 3 months. However, I personally do not recommend freezing them as they are best enjoyed on the day they are baked when they are at their softest or fluffiest.

To freeze, allow the cheesecake to cool completely, wrap securely with at least 2 layers of cling film, and finally, an additional layer of aluminium foil. Seal well in a freezer bag.

Can you refrigerate Japanese cotton cheesecake?

Japanese cotton cheesecakes actually benefit from an overnight chill in the refrigerator as it improves their flavour. I do recommend storing them in the refrigerator as soon as possible due to their dairy content.

Allow the cheesecake to cool completely at room temperature before storing it in a container with an airtight seal. Refrigerated, Japanese cheesecakes retain their fresh-baked quality for up to 5 days.

If you made this, I’d love to hear how you got on! And if you loved eating this light and fluffy Japanese cotton cheesecake, you’re likely to also enjoy my matcha chiffon cake. Or if you’re a true-blue cheesecake lover, then you can check out this dreamy raspberry cheesecake (great for Christmas and the holidays) or my all-time favourite blueberry cheesecake.

Japanese Cotton Cheesecake Pinterest Pin

More Delicious Japanese recipes you’ll like:

Light and Fluffy Japanese Cotton Cheesecake (スフレチーズケーキ )

5 from 6 reviews
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 45 minutes
Yield: 6 servings
Japanese cheesecake (a.k.a Japanese light cheesecake, cotton cheesecake or soufflé cheesecake) is a deliciously light and fluffy cheesecake with a smooth, melt in the mouth texture. This Japanese dessert is the perfect teatime or after-dinner treat that promises a rich and creamy taste that isn’t noticeably sweet.

Ingredients

  • 160 g block cream cheese I use Philadelphia's
  • 20 g unsalted butter
  • 60 g milk use full-fat for best flavor
  • 30 g cake flour
  • 1 tbsp corn flour
  • pinch of salt
  • 3 egg yolks use large eggs, 60 grams each (2 – 2.25 ounces with shell)
  • 3 egg whites use large eggs, 60 grams each (2 – 2.25 ounces with shell)
  • tsp cream of tartar
  • 60 g caster sugar

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven: Adjust the oven rack to the lower-middle position (I use the second rack position from the bottom). Preheat the oven to 120°C (248°F) with top and bottom heating mode.
    Note: This is NOT the actual baking temperature we want, but we start at a slightly higher temperature to compensate for the slight temperature drop when we finish setting up the water bath in the oven. The temperature should end up between 100-110°C (212 – 230°F).
  • Prepare a water bath: Boil enough water to fill a roasting pan with at least an inch/2.5 cm of water. I use a 2-litre/8-cup pot or a full kettle of water.
  • Prepare the cake pan: Grease thoroughly the sides and rim of a 6 x 3 inch /15 x 7.5 cm deep round pan – don’t leave any spot un-greased and go all the way up the sides to the rim. Line the bottom with parchment paper.
    Note: Do not line the sides with parchment paper as the baked cheesecake will have unsightly folds and creases around its sides which doesn't look nice. You only need to line the bottom of the pan with parchment paper as this will make it easier to un-mould the cheesecake. I do not recommend using a loose-bottom pan or springform pan to bake this cheesecake.
  • Set up a double boiler (bain marie): Fill a saucepan or smaller pot with 1 inch/2.5cm of water. Heat on a low setting until the water reaches a bare simmer.
  • Cream cheese mixture: Place the cream cheese, butter and milk in a heatproof bowl. Set the bowl in the double boiler. With a whisk, break up the cream cheese as it melts and keep stirring until the mixture becomes smooth and no lumps remain. Remove the cream cheese mixture from the double boiler and let it sit for 1 – 2 minutes to cool.
    What to look out for:  Do not let the cream cheese mixture get hotter than 60°C (140°F) otherwise it may end up toughening the protein in the yolks that are subsequently added. Check that the mixing bowl sits just above the water level inside the double boiler.
  • Flours and salt: Sift together the cake flour, corn flour and salt into the cream cheese mixture. Stir with a whisk until just absorbed. The mixture will be quite lumpy, this is OKAY.
  • Egg yolks: Quickly stir in the yolks, one at a time, with the whisk. Keep stirring until the cream cheese mixture becomes smooth. Use a silicon spatula to scrape off any cream cheese sticking to the bottom and sides of the bowl.
  • Strain the cream cheese mixture into an empty mixing bowl, pressing against the strainer with a spatula. Do not forget to scrape the mixture off the bottom of the strainer.
  • Meringue: Separately, place the egg whites and sugar in a large mixing bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a whisk. Sprinkle over the cream of tartar. Whip the egg whites at medium-high speed until firm peaks form. Reduce the mixer speed to low and whip the meringue for another 30 seconds (this helps eliminate large air bubbles, making the meringue fine and glossy).
    What to look out for: Observe the air bubbles and the general appearance of the meringue. As the air bubbles get smaller and begin to disappear, the meringue will start to get finer, thicker (foamier) and begin to look glossy. This is when you'll want to pause whipping more frequently to check for firm peaks. Stop when the meringue holds firm peaks that fold slightly into itself at the tip when the whisk or beaters are lifted.
  • Combine: Fold one-third of the meringue into the cream cheese mixture with a whisk until well incorporated. Fold in the remaining meringue, gently, to avoid deflating the batter. Once the meringue disappears, switch to a silicon spatula. Fold a few more times, again gently, until the batter is smooth and has a uniform consistency.
  • Fill the pan: Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan. Run a metal skewer in circles through the batter to knock out air pockets. Give the cake pan a few firm taps on the counter.
  • Water bath: Place a clean tea cloth in the roasting pan. Sit the cake pan on top Carefully pour the hot water into the roasting pan until an inch/2.5 cm deep. Open the oven door, and put the water bath set-up in the oven.
    Note: The temperature will drop slightly by the time you finish setting up the water bath. This is OK.
  • Bake: Reduce the temperature to 110°C (230°F). Bake for 60 minutes. Turn up the temperature to 160℃ (320°F) and set the timer for 15 minutes. Once the cheesecake surface browns evenly, turn off the oven. Let the cheesecake sit in the turned-off oven for 5 minutes. Open the oven door and keep it slightly ajar with an oven mitten and let the cheesecake sit for another 10 minutes.
    What to look out for: At the lower temperature, the cheesecake rises VERY SLOWLY so do not be overly concerned if it doesn’t rise much. Towards the end of the first 60 minutes, the cheesecake should have risen and look visibly puffed and dome-shaped in its centre. As the temperature heats up, this is when the cheesecake rises dramatically and browns at the same time.
    Please note that the cheesecake will shrink a little from the sides of the pan, and lose about a quarter of its height as it cools. This is totally normal for this type of cheesecake.
  • Release: Remove the cake pan from the water bath, take off the foil and immediately un-mould the cheesecake from the pan. To un-mould the cheesecake, place a piece of parchment paper followed by a wire rack/plate over the top of the cake. Gently flip over the cake. Carefully lift up the pan to release the cake. Gently peel the parchment paper off the base of the cake. Now, cover the base with another serving plate and flip over the cake again. Let cool completely.

Nutrition Information:

Serving: 6servings, Calories: 157kcal, Carbohydrates: 18g, Protein: 8g, Fat: 6g, Saturated Fat: 3g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g, Monounsaturated Fat: 2g, Trans Fat: 0.1g, Cholesterol: 109mg, Sodium: 221mg, Potassium: 140mg, Fiber: 0.1g, Sugar: 12g, Vitamin A: 243IU, Calcium: 120mg, Iron: 1mg
Cuisine: Asian, Japanese
Course: Breakfast, Dessert, Tea
Did you make this recipe? Be sure to leave a rating and a review in the section below, and tag @foodelicacy on Instagram and hashtag it #foodelicacy so I can see!